Employment

Deonne Luacaw
By Gabriella Chiarenza
Losing public assistance benefits when their income goes up incentivizes some workers to stay in low-paying jobs. It discourages others who are willing to work from joining the workforce. Explore the issue and what's being done.
Playdate Illustration
By Gabriella Chiarenza
Families with a lower income are more likely to use certain public benefits—and lose them with a small raise or higher-paying job. Here are some of the most common benefits people can lose when they go over a benefits cliff.
A retired couple watches Alta Lake in Whistler, Canada
By Liz Duda
Most people want to retire to pursue other interests or when they reach normal retirement age. But life events often play a role.
Man in wheelchair in office space
By Emily Hershman, Vijay Palaparty
Find out how to apply COVID-19 learnings to create a more inclusive and equitable workplace.
Nurse answers phone at reception desk
By Mary Hogan, Benjamin Horowitz, Ryan Nunn
Reforms can improve the rules of the labor market, helping workers and strengthening the economy.
Two men and two women in focus group conversation
By Sarah Miller, Ashley Putnam
Businesses tell us they're having a tough time hiring and retaining workers. Do people not want to work or is something deeper going on? We're conducting focus groups with workers to find out what's going on. Here's what we've learned so far.
Occupational licensing may keep foreign-born doctors from practicing medicine in the US
By Tyler Boesch, Ryan Nunn
From EMTs to lawyers, hair stylists to teachers, nearly a quarter of US jobs require a professional license. How can we make it easier for qualified workers to secure those jobs?
Mom sits in her backyard with son and baby daughter
By Ana Kent
When working women become mothers, they have to weigh the pros and cons of staying at their paid jobs. Here's how making it easier for moms to work could benefit the US economy, your community, and you.
By Heidi Kaplan
Workforce development and job service entities experienced the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, with almost all reporting disruptions in 2021. Here's what survey data tells us.
Individual in yellow sweater doing taxes
By Nathan Anderson
Many Americans with no or low income can benefit from expert tax-filing assistance, and in some cases, get thousands of dollars in tax refunds.